TGW Home | Podcast | Photos | Travel Tales | Videos | About the Tame | Contact | Japanese |

 


The Daily Mumble has moved!

This is an archive copy only and will no longer be updated.

The new edition can be found at www.tamegoeswild.com/words. Please update your bookmarks.

The feed address has not changed - subscribe here if you're not subscribed already!

Sunday, November 30, 2008

Tom and I run our first 15km

Great day today.

It started, in the beautiful autumnal morning sunlight, with Tom and I doing our first ever 15km run. This is a major achievement - I've never been a runner, and never would have thought that this year I'd be able to run 9.3 miles non-stop (ok, so I did stop briefly for a wee and to do my laces up).

We only started training about 7 weeks ago, and I remember how knackered I felt after doing 5km back then. The idea of doing a second 5km lap made me want to fall over.

Then last week we did the 10km. That was ok, although the final km sprint nearly killed me.

Today, my legs were fine until about the 12km mark, when my right knee - the infamous Trailwalker knee (which packed up on me halfway through the 100km Oxfam sponsored hike in 2007) started to ache. At 14km, my granny's hip syndrome reappeared, as it does occasionally when I dance. But still, we did it.

I had my iPhone tracking us for the entire 1 hour, 17 mins and 23 seconds. The map can be viewed on EveryTrail, although I recommend downloading the Google Earth file (link on the main trip page) and viewing it in that, as you can zoom around the emperor's garden and marvel at how we apparently jogged along the surface of the moat.

First ever 15km! at EveryTrail

Map created by EveryTrail:GPS Geotagging.

This is really exciting stuff! We're thinking of entering the full Tokyo Marathon and possibly Honolulu Marathon in 2010.




After a trip home for a shower, I was back out to Shibuya for a private lesson, then a few hours spent editing the photos I took for the nail shop, C&K Nail. Here's a few of the more interesting ones...

ckNail_sample_series2_1426

ckNail_staff_work_1342

ckNail_nail_closeup_1479

Have you ever seen nails like this?! It's one from their special winter range.

ckNail_samples_1464





Tonight I'm trying to catch up with my Japanese, as well as learn more about nutrition, and write a letter. Hmm, just not enough hours in the day!

I've decided to not eat any chocolate this week, so please, if you meet me on the street, don't offer me any.

Thanks :-)

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, November 08, 2008

The fragility of health

I'm reminded tonight of the relative fragility of our health. Following a week of intense activity (otherwise known as 'Overdoing it' or 'being a Tame'), dad is back in hospital with continuous angina attacks. I don't know the details - should find out in the morning. 

Another family that I'm very close to is also having a very difficult time, with one parent hospitalised, and two siblings undergoing chemotherapy. My heart goes out to you all.

Another relative of mine is suffering badly from the recent onset of some pretty aggressive arthritis, whilst a couple of other people close to me are battling depression, combined with other fairly serious ailments.

In situations like this I don't know what I can do, other than send all affected my love, and keep them in my thoughts.

So that's what I'll do.

[UPDATE, 6 hours later: I've just spoken to mum. Dad is being transferred to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Birmingham) for a second angiogram and possibly angioplasty (and maybe fitting of a stent).

Despite having to be on a lot of morphine, he's stable, and is being very well looked after.

Labels:

Friday, November 07, 2008

The Exercise Project


This morning's short jog, minus the first section where I was trying to get the GPS on the iPhone to work. Did a restart in the end.
Have you tried regular exercise over a prolonged period of time? I think most people probably have. For me though, it's a first.

It's still early days. The jogging-three-times-a-week thing only started a fortnight back, but already I'm noticing the difference. Firstly, my legs don't hurt as much after a run. Secondly, for the first time in my adult life I can touch the ground without bending my legs at the knee (OK, so I have to do the splits, but it's a start!).

But it's not these things that I'm most pleased about - it's the general feeling of healthiness. This week has been another week of very late nights and 7am starts, and not the most balanced diet in the world (haven't been out for shopping lately so lunch tends to consist of white rice with sesame, 10 tangerines and 3 bananas). Despite this, I'm feeling really energised. I can feel a difference both physically and mentally. Feel much more alert.

And whilst I might be drawing lines where there are none, I'm sleeping much better too. It's now often the case that as soon as I decide I want to sleep, I sleep. Deeply. Of course, this could be due to suppressed exhaustion, but I'm not so sure. It's not been like this before.

So whilst I don't recommend not getting enough sleep, I do recommend early morning exercise.

My regular route is published above, so you know where to find me if you'd like to join me :-)

p.s. I think we have a Trailwalker Team! More news on that to follow. Now off to work.

Labels: , , ,

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Offer: Reduced cost Lasik and place on Trailwalker Team 2009

*Twinkle*s laser eye surgery ('Lasik') has really turned out to be a great success. Whilst she was in a bit of discomfort for the few hours following the short op, by the next day she was doing OK (albeit not too fond of bright lights). A few weeks down the line and she's feeling the full benefit of being able to see clearly again (without the irritation or cost of contact lenses / glasses).

For anyone thinking of getting it done, we recommend the place that *Twinkle* and her sister used, near Hibiya/ Ginza in a somewhat futuristic complex above a swanky shopping centre. I forget the name now - I can check when I get home.

The cost is about 173,000 yen. If you don't have the money up front you can pay interest free over two years. If you mention our name (I think we'd need to give you a code) you'll get a 15,000 yen discount (disclosure: and we'll also receive a referral bonus).

The place has been doing great business lately through word-of-mouth referrals, and I must admit I'm not surprised given how straight forward and quick the whole procedure is.

I'll get it done myself once I've gone a bit more blind.

Drop me a line if you're interested.




Trailwalker 2009

Oxfam Japan have just sent out invites to participate Trailwalker 2009, and I must say, I'm tempted. It ties in nicely with training for the marathon etc.

Any takers? It's an unforgettable experience!

(Click here for our Trailwalker 2007 mini-site)

Labels: , ,

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Lap time

Really enjoying this jogging thing. It started out as a weekly Sunday
morning meet up with Tom, but now I've found the Olympic park I'm
going three times a week.

Unfortunately Tom was unable to make it this morning, but I went along
in any case and joined the many men, women and children, young and old
for a few circuits. There's some big school meet going on in the main
stadium today, so there were hundreds of teenagers running about the place too.

I started timing my laps for the first time this morning. Each lap is
2.1km, so as you can see I'm not exactly a lightening Bolt yet, but it's early days (and i'm more interested in endurance)

As soon as we get the Internet back I'll download that exercise app for the iPhone. It uses gps to track how far you've run / average
speed etc.

It's good having next year's quarter marathon to train for, but I was also thinking I'd like to challenge myself to run a full marathon too, perhaps in a year from now. I know I'll have to do quite a bit of work
for it as my right knee still gives me grief sometimes (that's one reason I stopped this morning after 9km), but still, I've never
thought of myself as a runner, or someone who could run a marathon -
it would be good to challenge that belief.

Anyway, on with the day.

(post, unnecessry line breaks and screen shot courtesy of iPhone)

Labels: , ,

Friday, October 03, 2008

IBC - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

As the number of people I know or know of who have been diagnosed with or who have died from cancer increases, so the idea that it's only something that affects other people fades away. My attitude these days is very different to what it was ten years ago.

Today I was sent a link to a video about Inflammatory Breast Cancer, which accounts for something between 1% and 2% of all breast cancer cases. I'd never heard of it, nor had *Twinkle*, and as the video explains, as there's no lumps involved it's often not detected, or mistaken for something else.

If you have breasts or know someone who does you might want to take a look at, just to be aware.

Labels: ,

Thursday, August 21, 2008

CELTA - it's like a rocket-propelled knitting competition

knitting_7944

Despite only getting to sleep shortly before 3am last night, and despite having not slept more than 5 hours in the previous 44 hours, I still woke up at 6.30am of my own accord.

It's been like this ever since I started CELTA. This is very unusual for me - normally I need a good 8 hours sleep each night (it's an integral part of my epilepsy-management program for starters).

I can think of 3 reasons why this is happening though.

1) I have to wake up at 6am three days a week to deliver sushi, thus my internal body clock is now tuned to that routine.
2) There's no curtains at my friend's house. I've not made time to get any big sheets of black paper with which to keep the morning light out.
3) ADRENALINE! This is a major factor. Doing CELTA is like taking part in a rocket-propelled knitting competition. The pace is extreme, and you can't let your attention falter: in addition to staying on course generally, every mile you have to deposit a freshly-knitted Tea-cosy at the checkpoint (a.k.a. teach guinea pig students every other day).

Studies have show that the adrenaline produced by this high speed knitting competition is equivalent in volume to that produces by 54 bungee jumps.

By the time next Friday comes around I should be a pro at both plain and pearl.

Wow. What a snug-fitting metaphor (...perhaps I should get some more sleep!)

Labels: ,

Monday, May 19, 2008

Monday 5am

Highslide JS
Signs of Spring

Yesterday at 4am myself, and 34 others who live in my block at Broad Lane Court, were rudely awoken by the ringing of bells. Doorbells.

It was a little alarming, as our doorbells are quite loud; we can hear the neighbours' bells almost as clearly as our own. All of them were going off together. After a few moments of lying there feeling semi-consciously confused, I managed to rouse myself - someone might be in trouble, desperate for attention. I stumbled down the stairs to the main door, and was soon joined by several flatmates in similarly dazed states. The bells had stopped ringing by now.

I looked out through the glass panels of the door, but all I saw a man strolling nonchalantly out of the courtyard. He did have the gait of a drunkard - it just seemed that he'd had a sudden urge to wake lots of people up. Which he successfully did.

Things like that don't really annoy me. I tend to just put them to one side and know that I'll understand that I'll probably appreciate why it happened at some later date. As it was, I was asleep again within seconds of returning to bed, so wasn't really inconvenienced.

Thinking over this later in the day, it struck me how light it had been at 4am.

Living in a thick-walled block of flats with only a small double-glazed window out onto the world, it's only too easy to become insulated from the natural cycle of the seasons. This, I feel, is a great shame. We've lived according to the rhythm of the seasons for millions of years. It's a fundamental cycle that I'm sure affects us as it affects the animals and plants.

Thinking about this, I realised that perhaps I had something to learn from the 4am bell-ringer. And that's why I could be found in the part at 5am today, doing my exercises.

I tell you, that 7am-Sunday-in-the-park thing - you can experience it weekdays too, at 5am! It was just beautiful. So peaceful. The sun was a fair way above the horizon, its lovely golden rays reflecting off a million little mirrors created by frost-coated blades of grass. Hitting the trees that surround the football pitch it made them seem like huge huggable cushions of green (although I admit they would probably not feel like cushions if fallen on from a considerable height).

So, a big thank you to the man who rang all of our doorbells at 4am, for re-connecting me with the rhythm of the world the other side of my double glazing.




Today promises to be an exciting day. At 8.30am I'll be meeting a few staff from various university departments, and we'll be heading off to a 3-day residential event near Nottingham, the aim of which is to get an exciting new project off the ground that seeks to utilise Web 2.0 tools in the enhancement of learning and teaching. I'll not be able to stay for the whole day today as what with this being week 12 (the final week of taught lectures) I have my last ever class with Nagai sensei (sniff). There's also a little awards ceremony to attend for the photo competition.

Anyway, best get on and eat my porridge. Lots to do before the rest of the world wakes up!

xxx

p.s. for someone who is a lot more in touch with natural cycles (pun intended), check out Bastish.net. I've mentioned this blog before. It tells the story of a couple who left the pressures of Tokyo city, to start life anew in the countryside. 

It's not just beautiful photography. I found the recent post "Lost in the countryside" very interesting. For me, it's a reminder that whilst the grass may be greener on the other side, it does require a lot of care.

Labels: , ,

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

A Whizz Boing Pop day


I find it astonishing (and at times disturbing!) how much detail my camera lens can pick up. My hand doesn't look so wrinkly to the naked eye, but an adjustment of the levels in the raw file shows the prints and lines in all their glory. I guess this is where photography is going now, especially with the advent of Nikon's incredible D3.

Got back into the daily exercise thing today. Up at 6.30am, out to the park to jog (and, er, take photos of the blossom. and my hand. that was a spur of the moment thing).



Then, at nine I took part in presenting for a CILASS IBL cafe (IBL = Inquiry based learning), a weekly event open to staff and students in which we present / discuss IBL related topics. Today we focused upon 'Being a CILASS Student Ambassador and Employability'. I won't say more about it here as I'll be blogging about it on the SA Network blog ...and I get paid to blog there! (I'll link to it when it's up). Really enjoyed that though. Lovely people I work with, wonderful start to the day.

Following that I popped along to the SEAS office having been summoned by email - they had a bottle of wine for me (and a timesheet!) to fill in following this year's open days, bless them. They are so kind. Only two weeks until a core member of the family leaves - I wonder how that will effect things?

Next it was on to a writing class, then translating literature from the 1950s. I am absolutely terrible at this, and for my last piece of coursework got my first ever 2:2 - with some of the categories seeing me down as far as a third. Whilst I enjoy reading the stories, when it comes to precise translation I am hopeless. The thing is, whist we have always had precise translation classes (at which I have always done pretty poorly) the general rule in everyday life is to go for the general meaning - and that's what I do. I think that's what we all do as humans really when we are unable to catch it all: we listen for familiarities and then fill in the blanks with our context-based knowledge. But you can't do that with precise translation. Whilst I was shocked when I got my feedback, I'm not upset about it at all. I just accept that this is not my strong point, appreciate that I have to try better next time, and move on (and not get a job which requires precise translations of 1950s Japanese novels).

Following that I went up to the healthfood shop Beanies to pick up my organic vegee box. I was in for a bit of a surprise there too as when I told the lady behind the counter my name so she could tick my box off, she said,
Oh, I know your name! My daughter was doing some research for something and found your blog. She told me about it as you'd mentioned us - and when I had a look I saw it was you!"


Back down the road and I discovered I'd accidentally kept hold of a key for some of the classrooms in the IC. I was a little bemused by this, why I had I done that? It all became clear when I got back to CILASS though, as Dr. N who runs the Case Studies project I participated in had just finished a meeting, and there was a fair bit of lovely italian food left over. Well, it would have been a shame to let it go to waste..!

Plate loaded down with the finest cheeses, pasta and pizza, I returned to a room in the bowels of the Octagon Centre where Japan soc was to meet a couple of hours later. No sooner had I sat down than *Twinkle* skyped me, and we talked, and talked.

It is such a treat to talk with her, makes me so happy. What I especially like is the way in which many conversations (like today's) become learning experiences. We really are pushing one another, each using our personal strengths to challenge one another's thinking. Makes it all so real, engaging, fun ...and makes me feel that I can't wait to be back together with her! 17th July is the day. Heathrow the place. She's so good for me; good job she's not seen through me yet...

Anyway, I've just realised that I've not written those two mini-japanese essays that are due in last week. I was going to write them this evening, but got carried away preparing the budget and other documents for Japan society - we hand over next week, and that will be it - my three years with them over :-(

It's been great though, what a fantastic learning experience. Thank you Japan soc.

so, er, yes, must sleep.

night night xxx

Labels: , , ,

Friday, March 21, 2008

Remains of the Steering Wheel


The past week has seen my daily exercise routine somewhat curtailed by temporary responsibility for my friend's car (which as no doubt you are tired of hearing, requires a lot of attention). But this morning, the car park refreshingly free of flat tyres, yellow tickets or vehicles supporting such accessories, I was able to get back out to the park. 

It's a very exciting time of year for the park, with the trees starting to blossom, the hedges sporting some fashionable green leaves, the daffodils trumpeting their fanfare of yellow across a sea of last year's leaves.

But things must have been extra exciting during my period of absence, as look what is now parked in the middle of the football field!

Yes, a completely burnt-out car.

And how about this for a steering wheel? Perhaps a little hard to use when manoeuvring out of a tight parking spot.


I suppose in a way, given all that happened last week, I should have been surprised that it wasn't the car that I'd been responsible for sitting there in all its naked glory!

Labels: , ,

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Coping

As fresh as a Greek daisy. One of the first ever flower-shots I took, back in 1996

I'm glad I don't usually have a car. Two parking tickets, a blow-out, and now today a section of the front bumper missing after someone reversed into me in the car park. I really am glad that on the whole, cars don't excite me.

It's been a pretty full-on few days. I was a photographer at a business seminar down south on Saturday - that was in-between the trouser-patch sewing, which incidentally when very well, although when I got home I realised that one of the patches was unintentionally shaped and positioned to look like a big testicle...

Having had the major Sheffield Graduate Award deadline on Friday, I'd spent much of the week getting my portfolio together. Thus, it was only on Sunday that I dared to finally re-open my to-do database.

Gulp. It was rather full.

One major to-do is my dissertation; I've got a deadline of Wednesday lunchtime to get the next section in, but it's not going to happen. I felt very weary on Sunday, and it soon became apparent that I wasn't going to do any work on it, as I was too busy hoovering, tidying up the noticeboard etc. Realising that this wasn't a good situation to be in, I gave myself permission to procrastinate for the rest of the day - provided I procrastinated by doing stuff that was on my to-do list (but required less emotional input). That turned out to be a good decision, as I managed to deal with a whole bunch of emails that demanded responses, I wrote a journal article (1 down, 3 to go!), sorted out some wedding stuff, spoke to *Twinkle*, processed some outstanding RAW images, changed the wheel on the car again, and dealt with the huge bunch of paperwork that has been gathering on my table with the legs sawn off.

At the end of the day I felt quite happy with how I'd turned it around.

Today is the first day in the past week that I've not taken a potent cocktail consisting of a large dose of Vitamin B and Caffeine to keep me going. As a result of this, my body has finally had a chance to reassert itself, by sending me to sleep in the library at lunchtime. To be fair though, I was up at 6am again today for the usual (if temporary) morning routine: This involves picking up food from a community centre with a scary alarm, delivering it to the university shop, processing returns, picking up the catering trailer from up the hill, setting that up on campus, and fetching water. I love challenging myself to apply Lean Production tecniques to cut down the amount of time it takes me to get this done. I've now got it down from 2.5 hours to 90 minutes. I like looking out of the window when I'm back home at 8am, seeing the traffic queues and thinking, "wasn't like that when I got up!"

With these temporary responsibilities I've 'not had time' for my daily exercise: the negative impact this loss has upon my energy levels is staggering.

Today has been semi-productive. I was in the library for about 8 hours, reading books when I wasn't dozing off. But I have felt under considerable pressure.

Indeed, tonight it did all get to be a bit too much for me. Absolute exhaustion, and a desire to say 'sod it all'. To ease things, I went and bought a big tub of ice cream, a bar of chocolate, and some stationary. I now feel somewhat better, and very fat.

More helpful than the consumption of 3 million calories though has been the recollection of a fundamental truth,

It Doesn't Matter.

None of it does. Journals will still be published without my input, life will carry on without my emails, I will graduate (with a 2:1) even if I only get 40% on all my modules. Just pass, that's enough.

As a treat, I gave myself an hour off my dissertation today and used it to look for jobs. That's something else that has been on my to-do list. It wasn't all that positive really, just tonnes of teaching jobs, but I'm not worried. I have a strong feeling that everything is going to work out for the best. I trust that when the time comes for me to act, I will know it.

I realised today that it's actually going to be another 4 months before I see *Twinkle*. That brought me down a bit. I've been missing her so much recently, probably partly due to the fact that she would really benefit from my support at the moment. I miss being very much in touch with how she is feeling today, emotionally, and I miss her physical warmth.

Hmm, still, the way things are going these four months will fly by, and before you know it we'll be back off to Japan. I am so looking forward to living with her again.

Well, it's now 10pm, and time for me to go to sleep. Tomorrow will be another long day, bu a productive and enjoyable one too, and thus I look forward to it.

Labels: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Organic vegetables, Nelson Mandela, and your own thought processes

Ha. It's another of those nights. Those nights when I go to bed, but feel so excited about everything and nothing that I have to get up again.

Part of it's the music, I know. I'm listening to Everything But the Girl - Walking Wounded. One of the few CDs I ever owned. Bought it in Switzerland I think, Interlaken. That was before I knew any Japanese. I remember that as the CD case has a bit of Japanese on it, and it was only a few years after I'd bought it that I realised what it said (Eee bee tee jee = EBTG). It's truly wonderful how music can take you back in time to a place, to a feeling, to a state of mind. Listening to this and looking at my swiss photos sees me up that Alp in 1997. Caw, that part of the world is staggeringly beautiful. I do hope that *Twinkle* and I end up back there one day (by that I mean that I hope that that remains one of our goals).

My weekly Organic Vegee box from Beanies

Doesn't that fruit and veg look delicious?! I love organic vegees so much, more than any form of processed food - including Crunchy Nut Cornflakes. The taste of a fresh organic salad is, according to the interaction between my taste buds and mind, the most delicious taste there is. The taste of this pile of fruit and veg could only be surpassed by an identical box of produce that I'd grown myself. It will happen.

I had a difficult day yesterday. I was feeling troubled by Nelson Mandela's treatment having finished his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom. What an incredible story. Certainly puts things into perspective. I think of his 27 years of incarceration, and of the appalling hardships endured by black South Africans under Apartheid, and then I think of complaints that I or my friends might have about noisy neighbours, our language course, or what so-and-so said... and I am reminded how spoilt we are. We have so much to be grateful for. Every single day.

Thank
.

You
.

When I reached the part of the book where he described his release I paused and paid a visit to You Tube, where I observed the same scene from outside of his body. Having just gained an insight into what had led to that moment I found it to be incredibly moving. I wiped the tears away, and bang! I was back there. Not South Africa, but our lounge, in front of the TV. It was the 11th of February 1990; I was 12 years old. ...I can vividly recall watching that live news report on the BBC. I'd heard of Nelson Mandela and Apartheid, and I remember being excited, and so happy, running around the dining room and the lounge.

It was cold outside.

Sun shines down beyond the Arts Tower

I went to give blood today. Unfortunately due to my history of epilepsy, I'm unable to be a donor until 2011, and was actually advised to never give blood. It's not that my blood poses a risk to others, it's that giving blood poses a risk to me in that it could trigger a seizure.

The nurses were very good about it - they could see I was upset. In fact, they treated me even more nicely after that, insisting that I go and sit down and have a cup of tea and a biscuit.

So, I'll just have to make do with saving people when I die instead :-) ...and keep on buying cakes all week from the Bone Marrow Society. (Bloomin' good cakes too).

I was pretty surprised by how many people were there. It was like discovering a whole hidden culture of Good Samaritans. How come I had never tried to donate blood before?



Been missing *Twinkle* a lot this week. In a way I wish I could bottle this experience, and keep it as a reminder for future years when we are 'always' together, to ensure that I don't get complacent, to ensure that I stay concious of how fortunate we are (will be) to be able to share our lives with one another.



I feel I've become more aware of our differences this year. Having so much space enables one to step back and think about how differently one sees some things. That's not a bad thing at all. I see her as my teacher, thus the more differing perspectives, the more we can both learn (I would add that I don't think that the differences would be so welcome if there was not an underlying meeting of spirit!).

I'm grateful that over the past year I have been encouraged to explore the idea that there is no right and wrong - there is only differing perceptions of 'reality'. This proves to be especially helpful in situations where social norms would normally dictate that conflict was the appropriate response. With there being no 'right' and no 'wrong' there is no impulse to convince the other that one is 'right'. One can have a completely different opinion from someone else, and yet accept that they are just as 'right' as you. After all, the 'thing', whatever it is, just is. It has no implicit meaning, it only has the meaning that we assign to it.

This way of thinking has really helped me to back down and accept *Twinkle*'s way of thinking without my pride getting in the way. I've not quite got it down to a fine art yet though - far from it! But, being aware is the first important step, and I'm glad to have taken that.

Changing the subject, this past week I've been marvelling at the brain's ability to assign meaning to things I see. I've been playing a little game whereby I look at something, and then observe my thought process as meaning is assigned. Of course normally it happens to fast that we barely notice (you look at a traffic light, and before the you know it, you know it's a traffic light!), but you can slow it down. One method is to turn the lights off so the room is pretty dim, then look around until you make out a shape. You can actually see you brain sorting through an amazingly comprehensive database of images, experiences, feelings, meanings! Absolutely amazing (and we think Google is clever...!). Another way to set yourself up for this experiment is to reduce the exposure on a bunch of photos, so the subjects are barely visible. Or, next time you meet someone whom you know you recognise but can't actually place or name, watch your brain sift through your memory bank in a bid to come up with a match of sorts.

Ahh, the pleasure of introspection!

Well, I'd best be off to bed. Up early tomorrow, and my list of things to do is almost as long as my nose :-)

Mush love xxx

p.s. I want this girl's voice.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,